Palace Auditorium

Palace Auditorium_

Farish Street’s Palace Auditorium was constructed c. 1911.  In 2014, the Business Journal  reported

The circa 1911 Palace Auditorium, 318 North Farish Street, is the lone building on the 300 block deemed to “contribute” to the cultural and historic value of the Farish Street Historic District. (Close to collapse: Engineers warn of dangerous structural deficiencies of Farish Buildings, November 7, 2014)

The second floor has fallen, resulting in the loss of bracing for the exterior walls, according to engineer Alfred Luckett.  Tony Dennis of Dennis Brothers Shoe Repair on the opposite side of the street from the Palace said the former nightclub was “one of the hottest spots on the block”–he ought to know as his family opened the shoe repair shop in 1938.  Palace Auditorium sign 2

According to journalist Jesse Yancy, since 1981, the Farish Street Financial Timeline reached $21,082,000 by 2011.  That figure includes the actual restorations of the Alamo Theatre, Scott Ford house, “rehab” of 37 historic houses, Farish Street revitalization, infrastructure, Farish St/Scott-Ford Museum, and the Medgar Evers House Museum.  There is no mention of specifically what was achieved in the ‘revitalization’ expenditures of $12 million.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Historic Downtowns, Mississippi and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Palace Auditorium

  1. ELMalvaney says:

    The Medgar Evers House isn’t in the Farish Street neighborhood, so probably shouldn’t be counted in this list, but in the list of Civil Rights grants on MissPres from 2011 is the First NAACP Office, which is on Farish Street: https://misspreservation.com/2011/07/28/mdah-announces-grants-awarded-to-civil-rights/

    Unfortunately, that grant of $208,104 was rescinded when the owners and the city failed to come to an agreement on sale price.

    • Suzassippi says:

      Hey, I am just the messenger, using someone else’s data. 🙂 And apparently, a whole bunch of money had to be repaid when folks did not do what they should have done.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s