Category Archives: Diversity Equity and Inclusion

Another look at Listen: Chris Wubbena

Posted in Diversity Equity and Inclusion, landscape architecture, Oxford, Social and Economic Justice | Tagged , , | 8 Comments

Dancing with an albatross

In another of the unmarked sculptures at Lamar Park, I have been unable to locate the artist and the title. Ya’ll know what that means. I will be talking about standpoints again. Somewhere along the way in my MSW education, … Continue reading

Posted in Country Philosophy, Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Ecosystem, landscape architecture, Mississippi, Modernism | Tagged , , | 12 Comments

Look under the rock: An inspiration from Anne

Mehrling Muse posted an interesting story about ice in the bird bath. One of the things I enjoy most about blogging is when conversations emerge between two (or more–those are really fun!) bloggers. Through an exchange, Anne responded with a … Continue reading

Posted in Acts of Restorative Kindness, Country Philosophy, Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Ecosystem | Tagged , , | 19 Comments

Unmarked: La tumba de Gregorio Cortez

Is this the place Gregorio sleeps? Does he lie beneath the iron cross Fashioned by some forgotten man To mark his final resting spot? Far to the east of the little plot Are rows of graves alone Their names told … Continue reading

Posted in Cemeteries, Country Philosophy, Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Social and Economic Justice, Texas | Tagged , | 10 Comments

Edmund and Susan King

As a child, I was an avid reader. Our parents bought an encyclopedia set for home, and a children’s series called Book of Knowledge, with a geographical encyclopedia called Lands and Peoples. I devoured every page in the BoK and … Continue reading

Posted in Black History, Diversity Equity and Inclusion | Tagged , , | 6 Comments

Tribute to Black History: Horace King, “the most respected bridge-builder in Alabama, Georgia, and northeastern Mississippi during the mid-nineteenth century”*

Note: Item has been updated March 1, 2022 with additional information about Edmund and Susan King An item on The Bridgehunter’s Chronicles last week led me to explore more about the southern bridge builder, Horace King. The Encyclopedia of Alabama … Continue reading

Posted in Bridges, Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Mississippi | Tagged , , , | 14 Comments

How traditions get their start

Many years ago, a colleague said to me: When someone asks me to do something, and it’s a long way off, it seems like a good idea from way far off. Then, the closer it gets I find myself asking … Continue reading

Posted in Acts of Restorative Kindness, Country Philosophy, Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Social and Economic Justice | Tagged , , | 17 Comments

Meanwhile, back in Itta Bena with the Favara family…Part II

Last week, I looked at John Favara and his family, Part I. Since then, I have reached the conclusion that I could write a book about the Favara family and their lives in Itta Bena and beyond. When I was … Continue reading

Posted in Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Historic Downtowns, Mississippi, Mississippi Delta Towns | Tagged , , , | 5 Comments

Ralph Lembo’s Home in the Woods: Itta Bena and the Blues

Yesterday was the unveiling of Mississippi’s newest Blues Trail marker. Rand and I made the journey to Itta Bena on a hot Delta day to acknowledge Ralph Lembo and his contributions to his adopted community of Itta Bena from his … Continue reading

Posted in Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Historic Downtowns, Mississippi Delta Towns, National Youth Administration, Statues and Memorials | Tagged , , , | 9 Comments

The Power of 200 Days: “To what do we regularly and consistently bring our attention?”

January 25, 2021, I wrote The Power of 100 Days and had asked the question “What shall I do with the next 100?” As I continue to do the daily meditations, I would think 1/3 of the way…I will do … Continue reading

Posted in Acts of Restorative Kindness, Country Philosophy, Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Ecosystem, Social and Economic Justice | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments